Apple and Samsung phones reportedly being investigated for emitting too much radiation

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:


  • Apple and Samsung are allegedly being investigated for emitting excessive levels of smartphone radiation, even higher than FCC limits, according to independent tests executed by the Chicago Tribune.
  • The specific smartphones targeted that were found to give off much higher radiation are Apple’s iPhone 7 and iPhone 8 and Samsung’s Galaxy S8, Galaxy S9, and Galaxy J3.
  • However, both companies said they comply with FCC regulation and said that the FCC tests are inaccurate.



The Federal Communications Commission is reportedly investigating Apple and Samsung smartphones after these were found to release high levels of radiation beyond the FCC limits.

Apple’s iPhone 7 and iPhone 8 and Samsung’s Galaxy S8, Galaxy S9, and Galaxy J3 were reported by the Chicago Tribune to issue levels higher than what is permitted by the FCC after tests by the radiation testing lab in California’s RF Exposure Lab.

The RF Exposure Lab is “recognized by the FCC as accredited to test for radiofrequency radiation from electronic devices,” says the Tribune.

The Tribune also noted that the tests were applied on only 11 smartphones, which mostly involved simulating the phones at a distance of 2 millimeters away from a human body, for instance, when the phone is in their pocket or when the phone is held to their ear during a phone call.

While health risks linked with smartphone radiation remain uncertain, smartphones, which are more widely used by young children and teenagers, are more exposed to radiation than older adults.

Apple, however, told the newspaper that the FCC testing was faulty compared with their own testing which observes FCC rules.  Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Business Insider.

Samsung also asserted in a statement to Business Insider that “Samsung devices sold in the United States comply with FCC regulations. Our devices are tested according to the same test protocols that are used across the industry.”

The FCC did not immediately respond to a request for comment by Business Insider.

 

Source: Business Insider

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